Tagged: blogathon

8

Girl Who Leapt Through Time, The

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time tells the story of Makoto Konno, your typical, tomboy-ish high school student. One day Makoto falls in a classroom and she suddenly has the ability to travel through time as she wishes.

5

Paco and the Magical Book

Tetsuya Nakashima’s Paco and the Magical Book tells the story of grumpy old Okunuki (Yakusho) as he enters a board meeting and is sent to a hospital, in which he meets a whole bunch of picturesque characters, including a little girl named Paco who can only retain memories for a day.

13

Summer Wars

Summer Wars is part techie-adventure, part family-dramedy. Coming from Japan, home of some of the finest quality animation, it’s got luscious art and flawless animation technique.

2

Korean Film Blogathon 2011 Highlights

And so the first Korean Film Blogathon by newkoreancinema.com and cineAWESOME came and went, with bloggers around the world writing about anything Korean Cinema related. A whole week with over 100 entries all about the good, the bad, and the weird — pun intended — of Korean films.

13

Korean Cinema vs. Korean Television

It’s quite clear (from the movies I’ve seen) that Korean movies are ballsy. They aren’t afraid to be graphic, they aren’t afraid to tell it as it is. They aren’t even afraid to play with taboo issues such as incest and cannibalism. So why aren’t Korean television dramas showing the same artistic freedom?

3

Auld Lang Syne

Auld Lang Syne follows two Korean men that used to be lovers as they meet once again by chance.

2

I’m Jin-Young

I’m Jin-Young follows the story of a little girl, whose name is Jin-Young, who can’t wait to grow up. This feeling of wanting to grow up fast is enhanced when she meets the friend of her mother, Hyun-ji… and falls in “love” with her.

4

Annyong, Sayonara

Annyong, Sayonara is a documentary following Ms. Heeja Lee, a Korean woman that lost her father when she was only 13 months old, back when her father was drafted by the Japanese army.

7

Haeundae

A small community of people are lovingly and realistically ensnared in this unique Korean movie. It’s generally touted as Korea’s first “disaster movie,” yet it is so much more than that.